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More Artist Installations at GSP

GSP International Airport added its fourth art installation in September. Albuquerque, New Mexico artist Evelyn Rosenberg created a three-panel metal quilt called “South Carolina Quilt.” The patches within the quilt pay homage to the Palmetto State with images of the State flag, Carolina Wrens and other SC symbols.

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This art piece is unique, because it was created using explosives, a process Rosenberg calls Detonography. She finds a spot in the desert and lays mold, metal, fabric, rubber, then C-1 explosive on top. When the explosive detonates, the fabric stamps an image into the metal and the mold. Rosenberg takes the metal back to her studio to add color.

She has created more than 40 pieces of public art for various institutions around the country. If you’re traveling through GSP, stop and see the quilt in person, hanging in Concourse A. Find out more about Evelyn and her technique at http://evelynrosenberg.com or check out her interview with GSP here.

– The Terminal

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Grand Hall undergoing construction

If you’ve strolled through GSP lately, you may have noticed construction past our new TSA checkpoint area, between Concourse A and B. This construction is part of WINGSPAN renovations and is our future Grand Hall. After completion, The Grand Hall will include everything from restaurants serving delicious food to an expansive view of our garden and airfield. Restaurants you can expect to see are DC-3, Wolfgang Puck and everyone’s favorite… Chick-fil-a.

The Grand Hall has come a long way since our last update as you’ll see in the picture below from nearly a year ago:

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Today, the construction is enclosed and coming to a near end towards the end of the year:

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We are eager for our Grand opening coming soon and to start enjoying WINGPSAN renovations with all of our travelers. We hope to see you there when the time comes!

Until next time,

-The Terminal

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Talking Security Doors

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The new doors at GSP may seem like ordinary automatic doors, but try turning around and they’ll give you an earful. The new security doors which are currently operational on the airport’s South End are on the second level as you are heading to Baggage Claim. The North End will soon get similar doors which should be operational by September. In the meantime the North End exit will be closed and travelers are being redirected.

The fancy new doors are a great new security feature for GSP.  And although we love that they talk, we hope you don’t have to hear them tell you to “turn back.” Check out what the doors have to say by clicking the video below.

 

-The Terminal

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Construction Update: TSA Checkpoint

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It’s been two months since we merged our TSA checkpoints into a centralized screening area and we wanted to take this opportunity to thank our travelers. Thank you for your patience during this phase of construction as we worked to shorten wait times with this new feature.

While we realize going through security is not everyone’s favorite part of travel, we’re still working to make improvements that will create a better all-around experience. For example, have you noticed the water walls on either side of the new TSA checkpoint?  They have a dual purpose! They’re a nice new aesthetic detail, but the sound of water flowing is also intended to create a more serene environment. While that may not give you extra minutes when you’re rushing to catch a flight, it may help soothe your nerves as you take off your shoes.

And, we have more to come! Before the year ends there will be new artwork going in the water walls from two different artists.  Amy Baur’s and Michael Krondl’s glass pieces will further help create a sense of place at the airport and celebrate Upstate themes of textiles, water and technology.

Construction continues but we wanted to take a moment to show our gratitude and give you a preview of what’s to come! Next week we’ll show you our new talking security doors!

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Putting the “Green” Back in Greenville: Daylighting and Automation Systems

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WINGSPAN has continuously incorporated sustainable architectural systems throughout the airport’s renovation process. From solar water heating systems to tree harvesting, GSP has made long-term sustainability a top priority. These energy efficient efforts in the airport’s architecture have truly made it unique in both appearance and function, enhancing the experience for all visitors.

Upon arrival, these sustainable architectural features can be seen during the drive to the curbside drop off area, where the airport’s glass facade and canopy illuminate its entrance. Extending over 700 feet, the facade acts as a passive daylighting system using natural light to reduce electrical requirements. In addition, the canopy extends 27 feet over the drop-off area to ensure visitors can exit their vehicles while being protected from the sun.

What is a passive daylighting system? Well, it is one of two main types of daylighting systems: passive and active. Both produce benefits greater than just energy efficiency. Studies have shown that increased exposure to natural sunlight in the workplace can benefit general health, memory and productivity. The main difference in the two, is that active daylighting tracks and follows the sun using mechanical devices; while passive daylighting uses static, non-moving objects to collect natural sunlight.

In addition to allowing more natural light, WINGSPAN renovations have also included a lighting automation system. This type of system is designed to automatically shut off lights if no movement is detected, monitoring and controlling lighting throughout the airport. This system further reduces unnecessary energy use.

To learn more of how GSP is keeping long-term sustainability in mind, read the past posts on sustainability!

-The Terminal

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Meet The Artists: Arthur Stern

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As part of the WINGSPAN renovations, seven artists were chosen to create new artwork for the airport. From canvas to glass design, GSP is thrilled to be featuring local inspired art in the newly renovated airport. Among other talented local artists, Arthur Stern’s work is the second of seven pieces to be installed recently. Stern specializes in architectural glass and stained glass designs. He draws inspiration from traditional American glass artists, combining such influences into unique designs that are strongly inspired by architecture. Stern considers himself to be a designer first and an artist second, creating pieces that are sensitive to the surrounding environment.

“My work is a continuous process of exploring and refining a personal abstract language that I can apply to the specific criteria of an architectural project. I look forward to opportunities where good architecture and interior design are made better through the creative use of glass,” said Stern.

Stern’s work was installed on July 18, with the help of Binswanger Glass.  A longtime friend and fellow artist, Blake Praytor was also on hand helping Stern oversee the installation. Praytor has photographed Stern’s installations throughout the years, and is excited to finally have Stern in his hometown, making this installation special for both artists. Complementing the newly renovated ticket lobby, Stern’s glass panel designs are displayed above both sets of elevators.  He also creates free standing sculptures, mixed media works on canvas and board, as well as works on paper. To learn about Arthur Stern and his work, check out his website!

-The Terminal

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Meet the Artists: Melissa Anderson

 

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As a part of WINGSPAN renovations, seven artists were chosen to create new artwork for the airport. The first of those pieces was installed on July 6 in the B concourse. The oil paintings were done by local artist Melissa Anderson who chose to create scenes from around the Upstate.

Melissa didn’t start off as an artist. She left a career as a lawyer to pursue her passion and now her art can be found throughout the state and country. Through self-directed training, Melissa used the discipline of her law practice and applied it to her artistic education. Today, her work is displayed all over Greenville in numerous private and public collections including: The Greenville Art Museum, The City of Greenville, County Bank, McCall Hospice House, the Washington office of Congressman Trey Gowdy, and The Cascades. While she lives and works in Greenville, her current show “Elegance of Native Soul” is hanging in Mitchell Hill located in downtown Charleston.

Learn more about her background and work in this recent interview, or visit her website!

-The Terminal

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Putting the “Green” Back in Greenville: Rain Water Harvesting System

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Long-term sustainability is a key part of WINGSPAN’s renovations. The integration of various sustainable practices has made for a more efficient and environmentally friendly way of flying within our surrounding area with the goal of instilling the “Green” into Greenville.

One practice we have instilled over the construction period that dates back to ancient Egypt and Rome has been rain water harvesting systems. In lieu of tapping into local water systems, the rain water harvesting system that WINGSPAN incorporated into the airport renovations is designed to collect rain fall, funnel the water to an onsite storage unit and store the water for long-term use.

There are several advantages to rain water harvesting beyond lessening reliance on local water sources. Water that flows from our faucets requires processing to ensure that it is safe to use. This process is designed to meet the requirements and regulations set by the Environmental Protection Agency, which takes time, resources and can be costly.

Rain water, on the other hand, is naturally softened, meaning it does not require the minerals, chemicals and contaminants that water processed for drinking requires. Rain water, when collected, stored and disinfected properly, eliminates some of the processing steps.

GSP only uses the rain water in non-potable ways and not as a drinking source. The water harvested at GSP does not need to undergo the same extensive purification processes that drinking water requires, using less energy and less money.

Stay tuned to learn more about how WINGSPAN is helping to preserve the natural beauty of the Upstate now and for years to come!

-The Terminal

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Putting the “Green” Back in Greenville & its Surrounding Areas: Tree Harvesting

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The development of WINGSPAN is rapidly growing and coming to an end, and in recent years the program has been surpassing its goals. Despite all these technological advances, GSP has continuously kept long-term sustainability in mind and truly strives to put the “Green” back into Greenville. They have been environmentally conscious in more ways than one throughout the renovation process.

One of the first phases of the North Wing construction started with the closing of the Short Term Parking Lot. In order to create more space, they creatively found a way to put its natural resources back into the development process. While it would have been easier to send the trees to a landfill, WINGSPAN had to make the most of the roots GSP was built on. The 26 historic trees that stood in the lot were processed into lumber and repurposed in architectural woodwork renovation designs. Thanks to the Upstate’s local businesses and lumber companies, each step of the process was energy efficient and no remaining parts of the trees were wasted.

To learn more details about the harvesting process of GSP’s historical trees, check out a previous post!

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Sustainability: Past Becomes Present

This week, we can’t help but look at the past and see how far we have come. As WINGSPAN renovations are coming to an end in the fall of this year, we continue to look ahead. A lot has progressed since we first began WINGSPAN, but then again a lot has remained the same.

One thing that hasn’t changed is keeping the environment a top priority. The WINGSPAN program has incorporated long-term sustainability into the renovations, which includes:

  • Solar-Heated Water
  • Rain Water Harvesting
  • Regional Materials
  • Day Lighting System
  • Automation System

Today GSP offers all of these eco-friendly renovations and we couldn’t be happier. Along with keeping the airport sustainable includes adding water bottle filling stations. About a year or so into the program, GSP started working on adding water bottle filling stations to address the airport liquids ban that requires travelers to discard beverages before passing through the security checkpoint, and the environmental issue of disposable plastic water bottles thrown in the trash daily. Today these water bottle filling stations are being used daily by our passengers.

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So, in case you missed our sustainability efforts, we are here to keep you updated. Stay tuned for more updates and as always, safe travels.

-The Terminal